Memory-Works: On Memory, Ethics & Architecture

The construction of memorials and museums all over the globe seems significant in the sheer vastness and magnitude of their number, as well as in the significance that these sites of memory may have in, and for, affected communities.

Cultural Memory of Yugoslav Volunteers in the Spanish Civil War [1]

During the Croatian War of Independence, the Croatian Army and military police had occupied the barracks, which were then handed over to the city of Rijeka and finally transformed into the university campus that opened in 2011. Since then I have heard rumours that a monument to the Spanish Civil War had once been located on the site of the former barracks, but the building of the campus had completely changed the landscape and all my efforts to track down information on the possible existence of a monument were fruitless.

The use and abuse of memories of the working class in 21st century Britain

Since 2010, the public memory of the working class has become more conflicted. The notion that ‘they’ are reactionary bigots has been strengthened by the result of the Brexit referendum of 2016. Most journalists overlook that many affluent residents of southern, rural England, voted to leave the European Union. They focus their ire on the deindustrialised areas of northern England – constituencies which also helped give Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party a landslide win in the 2019 General Election.

Lenin’s Mausoleum: A Haunted House on Red Square [1]

Siobhan Kattago, PhD, New School for Social Research of the University of Tartu Cover picture: People queue in front of the Lenin Mausoleum on Red Square, in the background St. Basil’s Cathedral and Kremlin. March 1925 | Bundesarchiv via Wikimedia Deutschland “Lenin lived, Lenin lives, Lenin will live!” Vladimir Mayakovsky Much has changed since the …

Memorial Monuments as Hangovers of the Socialist Yugoslav Past. By A. Jakir

Aleksandar Jakir, University of Split, Croatia, Department of History Cover picture: Monument to the Revolution (1967), World War II memorial in Podgarić, Croatia, one of Džamonja’s best-known works | Plamen at Serbian Wikipedia In all modern societies, monuments play an important role in the process of construction of the historical or collective memory. During the …

The art project as a tool for reflection on historical memory and genocide. By M. Morcate

Montse Morcate , PhD, artist, researcher and lecturer of photography at the Faculty of Fine Arts of the University of Barcelona Cover picture: Christian Boltanski. Réserve des Suisses Morts, 1991 The contemporary photographic art project has incontrovertible value as a tool for transmitting and reflecting on historical memory and genocide. In this respect, teaching in …

“The long shadow of the past” in the short light of present.

Picture: Horst Hoheisel, Die Tore der Deutschen, 1997, lighting display on the Brandenburg Gate.   By Horst Hoheisel, Artist Aleida Assmann, who will be awarded the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade together with her husband Jan Assmann this year (14 October 2018), has chosen one of my works (1) as the title image for …

Can memorials heal the wounds?

All images by Ana Milošević   By Ana Milošević, a researcher at the University of Leuven (KU Leuven), Belgium, affiliated with the Faculty of Social Sciences and the LINES Institute (Leuven International and European Studies).   In 2014, the Swedish artist Jonas Dahlberg won a competition for a memorial to the victims of the Utøya …